Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Setting Priorities for Good Dental Health

Many people have bleeding gums, and they don’t think twice about it. They view it as a minor inconvenience. If you were bleeding from any other part of your body, you wouldn’t hesitate to see a physician. If you lost a body part you wouldn’t hesitate to have it replaced. We have 32 teeth - they are all body parts.


While we may not need our teeth to live like one needs a heart, we need our mouth to be pain-free and functional to enjoy a good quality of life.
This is our passion. Make it yours and the rest will fall into place. Call and ask us how we may help you achieve your oral hygiene and health goals and ensure a greater quality of life.

But like exercising, dieting or anything that requires a routine, many of us fall short of a sustained effort to accomplishing long-term results. Why do we run out of toothpaste, floss, toothbrushes vitamins, etc. when we know their importance? Why do we have problems maintaining an oral hygiene regimen? Perhaps, we don’t make the answers priorities.
Call (757) 229-1224 today to schedule an appointment with one of our hygienists.

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Give the Gift of Whitening!

Whitening Your Smile

How we look and how we perceive ourselves has much to do with our self-esteem. When the color of our teeth makes us embarrassed to smile, it’s probably time to get our teeth whitened [bleached].

As one ages, teeth may darken from coffee, tea, smoking, berries and other substances that get into microcracks in the enamel causing discoloration. Some people have gray or brown bands on their teeth caused by an early childhood fever or tetracycline medication taken when the tooth enamel was forming. In some parts of the country where fluoride is found in natural high concentrations in the drinking water, individuals have developed teeth with bright white patches or dark brown blotches [mottled enamel or fluorosis]. 

Everyone is not a candidate for bleaching. Teeth discolored from aging have the best results. If you have tooth colored resin or composite fillings in your front teeth, they will not change color from bleaching and will “stick out like a sore thumb” after the procedure. If you would like to have your teeth whitened, call it to our attention at your next check-up visit. If you are not a good candidate, we can suggest alternatives such as bonding or porcelain veneers. 

There are various options to whitening your teeth. Bleaching can be an in-office procedure [chairside]. It may involve several appointments of 30-60 minutes each. The bleaching agent is applied to your teeth and activated with a special light. There is also an at-home procedure wherein you will wear a custom-made mouthguard, filled with a bleaching gel, as per instructions from your dentist. Some toothpastes have added whitening agents and can be used as an adjunct to the other two procedures. In any case, there is no reason to ever again suffer the embarrassment of discolored teeth.
 This is the Best Holiday gift idea!  Call our office today to get your friend or family members Whitening Gift Certificate. 

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Carbonated Beverages are Bubble Trouble

The single biggest source of calories [7%] in the American diet is from carbonated soft drinks. A carbonated beverage is one that releases carbon dioxide in normal atmospheric pressure. Artificial carbonation was first introduced in 1767 and after 1830, the sweetened and flavored lemon-lime, grape and orange carbonated drinks became very popular. Today, heavily sweetened, carbonated drinks or sodas are among the most popular beverages in the world. Consumption of carbonated soft drinks peaked in 1998 when consumption was 56.1 gallons per person per year. Soft drinks provide large amounts of sugar [mostly high-fructose corn syrup] to many individual's diets. The empty calories of soft drinks contribute to health problems, particularly obesity and tooth decay [caries]. A study from Harvard shows that soft drinks may be responsible for the doubling of obesity in children over the last 15 years.





Carbonated soft drinks not only have a high sugar content that contributes to tooth decay but also have a very acidic pH that can erode tooth enamel. Some of these drinks, especially the colas have as much caffeine as a cup of coffee and can disrupt children's or adult's sleep and leave them feeling tired during the day.
These carbonated soft drinks are also related to gastric distension, which can trigger reflux. Studies show the consumption of one can of soda a day corresponds to 53.5 minutes of elevated acid levels in the stomach.


The best approach is to cut down or avoid carbonated drinks. Many schools have removed the soft drink vending machines in their halls and cafeterias. If not, it's best to drink through a straw so the soda is swallowed from the back of the mouth and does not come in contact with the teeth causing decay. Substitute other beverages such as water and more nutritious beverages like milk and juices.

Monday, November 17, 2014

Preventive Dentistry: Toothbrushing

Toothbrushing is an effective way of removing plaque [sticky mixture of bacteria, food & debris] from your teeth. Daily removal of plaque can prevent tooth decay and periodontal [gum] disease. Select a toothbrush that will provide easy access to all areas of your mouth; this includes one with a small head [1 inch by ½ inch] and a flexible head or handle. The brush should have soft nylon bristles with round heads and a wide handle for a firm grip. There are also a variety of electric or sonic brushes that work well. Call our office for a recommendation.



Establishing a daily pattern and a consistent approach to your brushing technique is important to ensure that you have accomplished adequate cleaning. One easy technique involves placing the toothbrush at a 45° angle to your teeth and gently brushing in an elliptical motion. Start on the same quadrant [same side, lower or upper] each time. Brush the outside of the teeth, the inside and the biting surface. Repeat this action with the other three quadrants. When you are finished, brush you tongue. Adequate brushing should take 3-4 minutes.


There are other effective brushing methods that may be appropriate for you, depending on the condition of your teeth and gums. Bring your brush to your next check-up visit and have our hygienist review your technique.
Toothbrushing is most effective if done right after eating. It would be a wise idea to keep an extra brush at work for after lunch or snacks. Toothpaste is not necessary if you are using fluoride toothpaste at home 1-2 times a day. Just rinse with water when you are finished.
Effective toothbrushing starts with habit and routine and ends with time, diligence and good technique.


Wednesday, November 5, 2014

What Are Dental Implants?

Dental implants offer people an alternative to the traditional ways of replacing missing teeth. The actual implant is an artificial root [anchor] made from synthetic material, usually titanium metal. There are three phases to the implant process.



First, the dental implant is surgically placed into the jawbone. It takes 3-6 months to fuse with the bone [called osseointegration]. An abutment [post] is attached to the implant and protrudes above the gum tissue. A replacement restoration is cemented or screwed to the implant abutment. Depending on the situation, dental implants can support a fixed crown or bridge or act as a stabilizing base for a full denture. The procedure can take up to 9-12 months for completion and has a high degree of success.

Some individuals have had so much bone resorption [loss] that the remaining bony ridge is too thin to hold an implant. In many cases, synthetic or natural bone can be grafted [added] or grown to allow for dental implants as an alternative treatment.

Implants have a great advantage for people already wearing full dentures since they can support and stabilize the denture while minimizing further bone loss of the denture ridge.
Not everyone is a good candidate for dental implants. There are certain risk factors that may limit success including smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, chronic bruxism [grinding teeth], systemic problems such as diabetes and individuals with poor oral hygiene.

Dental implants offer a “second chance” to those who have lost all of their teeth. For people missing only one or several teeth, dental implants provide benefits as an alternative way to restore your mouth. To determine if implants are for you, a clinical examination, x-rays, study casts and other appropriate records and measurements will be necessary. Call our office at (757) 229-1224 if you have questions or would like to schedule a complimentary consultation.

Monday, October 20, 2014

New Teeth While You Wait

Between work and family obligations, most individuals have very hectic and tight schedules. Often dental treatment is put off because of actual or perceived time commitments on the part of a patient. This office has invested in a hi-tech system called CEREC that allows us to fabricate a permanent all ceramic crown [cap], onlay or veneer in one single office visit. This means fewer injections, less drilling and less time taken away from your daily activities. This computerized system allows us to use strong, tooth-colored ceramic materials to restore your teeth to their natural strength, beauty and function. These materials closely match the composition of natural tooth structure. The significance of this fact means when you eat hot food and drink something cold, the restoration and tooth expand and contract at almost equal rates, minimizing the chance of your tooth cracking. Also, the ceramic restorations are chemically bonded to your teeth, so we can preserve as much healthy tooth structure as possible.

First, we examine the tooth or teeth to determine the appropriate treatment. It could be a simple filling, or a full crown, depending on how much healthy tooth structure is remaining in our clinical judgment. Next, we administer an anesthetic and prepare your tooth for the restoration, removing decayed and weakened tooth tissue. This preparation is just like we would do for many other restorative techniques.
Then, we take an Optical Impression of the prepared tooth. Instead of filling a tray with impression "goop" that you must bite into and hold in your mouth until it hardens, we coat the tooth with a non-toxic, tasteless powder. A camera is used to take a digital picture of your tooth. This whole Optical Impression process only takes a minute or two.

Next, the CEREC machine helps us create the restoration for your tooth. The CEREC 3D software takes the digital picture and converts it into a 3-dimensional virtual model on the computer screen. We use our dental expertise to design the restoration using the CEREC 3D computer program. Within a few minutes, with the click of a button, the restoration design data is sent to a separate milling machine in the office. A ceramic block that matches your tooth shade is placed in the milling machine. About 10 - 20 minutes later, your all-ceramic, tooth-colored restoration is finished and ready to bond in place. Finally, we try the restoration in your mouth to ensure proper fit and bite. The restoration is then polished and bonded to the prepared tooth. Your tooth is restored with no "temporary" or return trip necessary. Please call our office to see if you are a candidate for this procedure.


Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Use it or Lose it!


Did you know that if you don't use all of your dental insurance benefits or money in your flexible spending account (FSA) this year, you lose them forever? That's right - no dental benefit plan or FSA we know of allows you to carry unused benefits over to the following year. If you don't use them, you lose them!

You may have benefits remaining this year. Waiting until next year means that not only will you lose any unused benefits for this year, but also that you may have to first satisfy a new year's deductible before any benefits will be paid.

If you have been postponing dental treatment, call our office at (757) 229-1224 to see if you have benefits remaining this year. We also have various financing options to help with any portion not covered by dental insurance.


Tuesday, September 23, 2014

A beautiful Smile is Precious and Priceless

Did you know that the shape, shade, length and spacing of your teeth could significantly affect your smile? And our smiles can greatly affect our self-esteem and confidence. Common conditions that impact negatively on your smile include broken, cracked or worn teeth, discolored teeth, missing teeth, crooked teeth, decayed teeth, gaps between your teeth and/or "gummy smiles." The good news is that with modern technology and improved materials, these situations can be dramatically changed to create natural looking and long-lasting beautiful smiles. Each patient and each specific circumstance must be evaluated on its own merits. Factors such as occlusion [bite], oral habits, available space, health of the gum tissue, severity of the problem and patient expectation must be taken into consideration while planning your cosmetic makeover. Depending on the situation, there are a variety of choices that all result in excellent esthetic outcomes. For whiter natural teeth, in-office or at-home bleaching [whitening] techniques are available. Repairing teeth or closing spaces may be accomplished with tooth-colored composite resin bonding, porcelain veneers or porcelain crowns. These procedures vary in time and cost and have differences in longevity and appearance. If you're not satisfied with your smile or want to learn if you're a good candidate for any of these remarkable techniques, call our office for a cosmetic consultation at (757) 229-1224 or visit our website at www.SmilesOfWilliamsburg.com.

Monday, September 8, 2014

Help! I Broke my Tooth!

Almost every day we get a call from a patient who has broken a tooth, and generally it means that to save the tooth, we have to place a crown or permanent restoration over it to keep it from breaking further. Sometimes the tooth can't be saved and that is a real bummer!
What causes teeth to break? Well, there are several factors, one of which we see in almost all tooth fractures. The most common contributing factor is Silver amalgam fillings- these fillings have the unique property of enlarging as they age. So, there seems to be some outward pressure on the tooth and if someone bites just the right (or wrong) way, you hear that crack!
Now this tooth broke in several planes at once, and had to be removed; there wasn't enough sound tooth structure to save it! So an implant or bridge needed to be done.
This is a more common sort of fracture. The inside aspect of the tooth just shears away. Luckily, this tooth can be saved with a crown, after first making sure there is no decay present.
The second common factor is bruxism- the habit of grinding or clenching the teeth. Many bruxers break teeth that don't even have fillings in them, but they always have a higher percentage of broken teeth than people who don't brux or clench.
If you or someone you know does grind their teeth and are worried about a tooth or some teeth, don't hesitate to give us a call and we will be glad to check it out for you! Don't wait until it hurts!

For more information, or to schedule a cleaning, call your favorite Williamsburg dentist, Dr. James A. Burden, at (757) 941-7079!

Thursday, August 7, 2014

Handling Dental Emergencies

Dental emergencies may be categorized as toothaches, injuries or broken appliances.

Toothache If a toothache develops, using a brush and floss, clean the suspected area. Rinse with warm salt water. Do not place an aspirin on the gums or tooth [this may cause a burn]. Apply a cold compress to any facial swelling. Take acetaminophen [Tylenol] and call us as soon as possible.
Avulsed Tooth If a permanent tooth is knocked completely out, time is of the essence. Immediately call us for an emergency appointment. It is critical to get the person and their tooth to us within one half hour. This makes it possible to re-implant the tooth with a high degree of success. Find the tooth, and holding it by its crown, gently rinse it to remove dirt and/or debris. Do not scrub the tooth. If possible, gently place the tooth back in its socket as a means of transport. Otherwise, transport the tooth in a cup of milk, saline [salt water], or saliva [place tooth between cheek and gum, unless child is too young]. If none of these are available, use a cup of plain water.
Extruded Teeth If a tooth is pushed either inward or outward, try to reposition the tooth using light finger pressure. Do not force the tooth into its socket. Try to get the injured person to us as soon as possible. The tooth may be stabilized and held in place with a moist tissue or gauze on the way over.
Fractured Teeth First rinse your mouth with warm water to keep it clean. Immediate dental care is necessary. The treatment will depend on the severity of the fracture and could range from smoothing out the chip to bonding with a resin [tooth colored] material to placing a crown [cap]. If there has been pulp [nerve] injury, root canal may be necessary at once or at a later date.
Soft Tissue Injury The tongue, lips or cheeks may be bitten, lacerated [cut] or punctured. If there is bleeding, apply firm pressure with a gauze or clean cloth. If bleeding doesn’t stop within 15 minutes, bring the person to our office or a hospital emergency room. Sutures [stitches] may be necessary. Otherwise, clean the area with warm water on a gauze or clean cloth. Apply an ice compress to the bruised or swollen area. Contact us for further instructions.

For more information, or to schedule a cleaning, call your favorite Williamsburg dentist, Dr. James A. Burden, at (757) 941-7079!

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

"Here, use my toothbrush..."

Ever use someone else's toothbrush? You may think twice about doing it again after reading this: (1) Toothbrushes can be a source of repeated dental infections. (2) Toothbrushes can cause a bacteremia (bacteria entering the bloodstream) that may result in an endocarditis (a heart infection). (3) Toothbrushes can harbor and transmit viruses and bacteria. (4) Toothbrushes can retain 50% of the herpes simplex virus for one week. (5) Gingival [gum] inflammation can be reduced by changing toothbrushes biweekly.
Still think it's sexy to share a toothbrush? How about sharing food? Kissing? Certain bacteria can be transmitted from site to site in the mouth via dental instruments or from person to person sharing someone else's eating utensil. In juvenile periodontitis, virulent bacteria can move from an infected site to an uninfected site in the same mouth. Other bacteria can be transmitted between spouses. Some bacteria can be transmitted between parents and children. Still other bacteria can be transmitted from dogs to children.
So you see, bacteria once thought to be localized to specific sites in the mouth can be migratory. We're not advocating that you stop tasting a scrumptious morsel or two at a four-star restaurant; we are advocating that everyone maintain good dental health not only for themselves but for the sake of those they love.
As far as ridding toothbrushes of bacteria, soaking them in a mouthrinse containing essential oils for 20 minutes kills 100% of the bacteria on the bristles. Ultraviolet light also sanitizes toothbrushes. But when researchers* tested the efficacy of using a toothpaste containing a common disinfectant compound - triclosan - they found little benefit when it came to eliminating the offending bacteria attached to the toothbrush bristles.
So what can you do about bacterial contamination from toothbrushes? Soak them in a suitable mouthwash, expose them to ultraviolet light, or from a practical stance, change them frequently. As for kissing someone, the benefits may still outweigh the risks... as long as you have an inkling as to their periodontal status!
*Warren DP, Goldshmidt MC, Thompson MB, Adler-Storhz K, and Keene HJ: The effects of toothpastes on residual microbial contamination of toothbrushes. JADA 132:1241-1245, 2001.

For more information, or to schedule a cleaning, call your favorite Williamsburg dentist, Dr. James A. Burden, at (757) 941-7079!

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Setting Priorities for Good Dental Health

Many people have bleeding gums, and they don’t think twice about it. They view it as a minor inconvenience. If you were bleeding from any other part of your body, you wouldn’t hesitate to see a physician. If you lost a body part you wouldn’t hesitate to have it replaced. We have 32 teeth - they are all body parts.
While we may not need our teeth to live like one needs a heart, we need our mouth to be pain-free and functional to enjoy a good quality of life.
But like exercising, dieting or anything that requires a routine, many of us fall short of a sustained effort to accomplishing long-term results. Why do we run out of toothpaste, floss, toothbrushes, vitamins, etc. when we know their importance? Why do we have problems maintaining an oral hygiene regimen? Perhaps, we don’t make the answers priorities.
We in this dental office believe in the philosophy espoused by Dr. F. Harold Wirth who said, "The mouth in its entirety is an important and even wondrous part of our anatomy, our emotion, our life; it is the site of our very being. When an animal loses teeth, it cannot survive unless it is domesticated; its very existence is terminated; it dies. In the human, the mouth is the means of speaking, of expressing love, happiness and joy, anger, ill temper, or sorrow. It is the primary sex contact; hence it is of initial import to our regeneration and survival by food and propagation. It deserves the greatest care it can receive at any sacrifice."
This is our passion. Make it yours and the rest will fall into place. Call and ask us how we may help you achieve your oral hygiene and health goals and ensure a greater quality of life.

For more information, or to schedule a cleaning, call your favorite Williamsburg dentist, Dr. James A. Burden, at (757) 941-7079!

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Teeth Whitening

How we look and how we perceive ourselves has much to do with our self-esteem. When the color of our teeth makes us embarrassed to smile, it’s probably time to get our teeth whitened [bleached]. As one ages, teeth may darken from coffee, tea, smoking, berries and other substances that get into microcracks in the enamel causing discoloration. Some people have gray or brown bands on their teeth caused by an early childhood fever or tetracycline medication taken when the tooth enamel was forming. In some parts of the country where fluoride is found in natural high concentrations in the drinking water, individuals have developed teeth with bright white patches or dark brown blotches [mottled enamel or fluorosis]. Everyone is not a candidate for bleaching. Teeth discolored from aging have the best results. If you have tooth colored resin or composite fillings in your front teeth, they will not change color from bleaching and will “stick out like a sore thumb” after the procedure. If you would like to have your teeth whitened, call it to our attention at your next check-up visit. If you are not a good candidate, we can suggest alternatives such as bonding or porcelain veneers. There are various options to whitening your teeth. Bleaching is an at-home procedure wherein you will wear a custom-made mouth guard, filled with a bleaching gel, as per instructions from your dentist. Some toothpastes have added whitening agents and can be used as an adjunct to the other two procedures. In any case, there is no reason to ever again suffer the embarrassment of discolored teeth.

For more information, or to schedule a cleaning, call your favorite Williamsburg dentist, Dr. James A. Burden, at (757) 941-7079!

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Gum Chewing: Helpful or Harmful?

While there is no question that regular chewing gum promotes tooth decay, there is clinical evidence that demonstrates just the opposite for sugar-free gum. Studies have shown that using sugar-free chewing gum after meals and snacks, especially when toothbrushing at those times is impractical, helps reduce the acid level and its potential detrimental effect on the enamel. Its mechanism of action is the stimulation of 10 times the normal rate of salivary flow due to both the act of chewing and the flavor of the artificial sweetener (sorbitol or xylitol). The saliva washes away food particles and acid produced by bacteria in the plaque and neutralizes the acid because of increased concentration of bicarbonates. Chewing sugar-free gum is not intended to replace toothbrushing and flossing. Sugar-free gum is also recommended for people with xerostomia (dry mouth) to stimulate increased salivary flow, along with drinking greater amounts of water (6-8 glasses a day). However, those experiencing TMD (temporomandibular joint disorder) symptoms should refrain from chewing any gum.

For more information, or to schedule an appointment, call your favorite Williamsburg dentist, Dr. James A. Burden, at (757) 941-7079!

Monday, June 9, 2014

Benefits of Maintaining Your Teeth


Most people know that maintaining good dental health into old age has many benefits. Those most important include comfort of the teeth and gums, the ability to enjoy food, and a better appearance.
Studies have shown that those individuals who have poor dental health have a higher mortality rate than those who were in better dental health. Moreover we can point to the impact of nutrition as the most likely contribution to health.
The elderly like younger patients should see their dentist at least twice a year for check ups and cleanings. All cavities, gum disease, and other dental infections should be treated promptly. Patients wearing full or partial dentures should have them evaluated for proper comfort and fit. Dentures that have been worn for many years may not fit well anymore. This happens because the jawbone under the denture can become worn away over time.
Loose dentures make it difficult to eat, speak, and do not support the face as well. A loose denture begins to need more and more adhesive to stay in place. Your dentist can sometimes remedy the problem by relining the denture, but a new denture should be made about every 5 to 7 years, or when the dentures cannot be used comfortably. In some cases, implants can be used to help secure the dentures. This is usually needed in the lower jaw and is sometimes the only way to help the patient stabilize and use their denture.
Remember, maintaining good dental health along with proper nutrition is a key factor in living a long healthy life.
For more information, or to schedule a cleaning, call your favorite Williamsburg dentist, Dr. James A. Burden, at (757) 941-7079!

Friday, April 18, 2014

Tough Brushing Tortures Teeth


Most dentists don’t go a day without seeing patients who are damaging their teeth and gums by brushing too hard. Some report that as many as two out of three patients brush their teeth too hard. This is a problem. A stiff-bristled toothbrush combined with overzealous brushing teeth can cause serious dental problems over time, including gum disease and tooth sensitivity.
 
People think that if they brush twice as hard, they will do twice as much good, In fact, overzealous brushing can cause significant damage to the periodontal tissues and bones that support the teeth. If you used the same amount of force and brush the side of your arm, you could take your skin off.
 
One way to avoid damaging your teeth and gums is to purchase a "soft" toothbrush featuring rounded bristles which are less abrasive to teeth. You should hold the brush between the thumb and forefinger, not with the fist. When brushing, do not `scrub' the teeth with a horizontal, back-and-forth motion.
 
Instead, start at the gum line and angle the brush at a 45-degree angle. Brush both the teeth and the gums at the same time. Push hard enough to get the bristles under the gum line but not so hard that the bristles flare out. It's also a wise move to limit the amount of toothpaste because it is abrasive.
 
The irony is that dentists want people to brush longer, not harder. Children and adults tend to spend less than one minute at a time brushing their teeth, even though removing plaque from the mouth requires at least two to five minutes of brushing at least twice a day. Remember: brush longer, not harder. 

For more information, or to schedule a cleaning, call your favorite Williamsburg dentist, Dr. James A. Burden, at (757) 941-7079!

Friday, April 11, 2014

6 Easy Ways to Prevent Cavities in Kids

Kids and cavities seem to go hand in hand. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 28 percent of children ages 2 through 5 have at least one dental cavity, compared to 24 percent a decade ago. Although 4 percent may not seem like a lot, that increase represents thousands and thousands of children and cavities -- as well as a trend in the opposite direction of the last 40 years, when tooth decay was on a gradual decline. So if you have children and cavities are a concern, here are six easy ways to reduce the risk:

1. Avoid giving your baby juice or formula at night. The sugar in juice and formula causes the bacteria in the mouth to produce the acids that cause baby bottle tooth decay. Use fluoridated water instead.

2. Choose low-fat foods from the basic food groups. Raw fruits and vegetables, nuts, whole-grain breads and low-fat dairy products are great for your child's overall health and their dental health!

3. If you must, give sweets only as a dessert. If your child must have sweets, limit it to dessert or following a main meal. Late-night snacking and frequent snacking are a major culprit of cavities in children.

4. Invest in a water filter. Instead of spending extra on bottled water, invest in a filter for your sink, or a filtered water pitcher. Fluoridated tap water is an excellent resource to help the battle between children and cavities.

5. Don't share cups or utensils. Cavities are contagious. So if you have them, you can pass them onto your child by sharing cups and utensils.

6. If you smoke, stop. The University of Rochester's Strong Children's Research Center has discovered a link between smoking, children and cavities. Results from a study show that children of parents who smoke are more likely to develop cavities.

For more information, or to schedule a cleaning, call your favorite Williamsburg dentist, Dr. James A. Burden, at (757) 941-7079!

About Me

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With over 20 years of creating smiles, we are proud to provide gentle, family-oriented dental care to the adults and children of our community. We are located in Williamsburg, just minutes from York county, Toano, Denbigh/Newport News and surrounding areas.